RL.6: Craft and Structure

Anchor StandardCCRA.R.6 Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
11th-12th GradesRL.11-12.6 Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).
9th-10th GradesRL.9-10.6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.
8th GradeRL.8.6 Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor.
7th GradeRL.7.6 Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text.
6th GradeRL.6.6 Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text.
5th GradeRL.5.6 Describe how a narrator’s or speaker’s point of view influences how events are described.
4th GradeRL.4.6 Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.
3rd GradeRL.3.6 Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters.
2nd GradeRL.2.6 Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud.
1st GradeRL.1.6 Identify who is telling the story at various points in a text.
KindergartenRL.K.6 With prompting and support, name the author and illustrator of a story and define the role of each in telling the story.
Anchor NotesTo build a foundation for college and career readiness, students must read widely and deeply from among a broad range of high-quality, increasingly challenging literary and informational texts. Through extensive reading of stories, dramas, poems, and myths from diverse cultures and different time periods, students gain literary and cultural knowledge as well as familiarity with various text structures and elements. By reading texts in history/social studies, science, and other disciplines, students build a foundation of knowledge in these fields that will also give them the background to be better readers in all content areas. Students can only gain this foundation when the curriculum is intentionally and coherently structured to develop rich content knowledge within and across grades. Students also acquire the habits of reading independently and closely, which are essential to their future success.

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