RI.1: Key Ideas and Details

Anchor StandardCCRA.R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
11th-12th GradesRI.11-12.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
9th-10th GradesRI.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
8th GradeRI.8.1 Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
7th GradeRI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
6th GradeRI.6.1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
5th GradeRI.5.1 Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
4th GradeRI.4.1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
3rd GradeRI.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
2nd GradeRI.2.1 Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, andhow to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
1st GradeRI.1.1 Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
KindergartenRI.K.1 With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
Anchor NotesTo build a foundation for college and career readiness, students must read widely and deeply from among a broad range of high-quality, increasingly challenging literary and informational texts. Through extensive reading of stories, dramas, poems, and myths from diverse cultures and different time periods, students gain literary and cultural knowledge as well as familiarity with various text structures and elements. By reading texts in history/social studies, science, and other disciplines, students build a foundation of knowledge in these fields that will also give them the background to be better readers in all content areas. Students can only gain this foundation when the curriculum is intentionally and coherently structured to develop rich content knowledge within and across grades. Students also acquire the habits of reading independently and closely, which are essential to their future success.

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